Hand Dyed Yarn – OMG Yarn (balls)

Hand Dyed Yarn

How to Dye Yarn with Kool-Aid

October 3, 2017




Way back when, in 2011, I had just become a stay at home mom and I needed to find some ways to pass the time. I opted to hone my fiber arts craft and spent the days knitting and crocheting.

One day, my mother mentioned to me that I should try dyeing yarn with Kool-Aid. And I did! I was a long process. I didn’t know about putting yarn into hanks yet, so I ended up with a ton of yarn barf.

Of course, over the years I taught myself a few different dyeing techniques and learned ways to make dyeing easier for myself. Recently, I was looking for something to do with my 8-year-old and 3-year-old sons toward the end of the summer break and I decided to go back to basics.

Since speckle dyeing is the trend right now, I wanted to teach the boys that technique, but without using the professional powdered yarn dyes I use. I thought, let’s dye yarn with Kool Aid!

Even better, why not make something for them that they could show off out of that yarn that they made. The idea was instantly a hit with the kids; they always love watching mom dye yarn, looking like a mad scientist in the process.

Here we go!




What You’ll Need:

  • White vinegar
  • A Liquid Measuring Cup
  • One hank of an animal based fiber yarn (we used my OMG Liberty yarn base; a worsted weight 100% Superwash Merino Wool) – cotton and acrylic yarn will not work for this technique
  • One Large Pot (at least 4 QT)
  • Water
  • Stove
  • Kool Aid packets of any flavor without sugar added
  • Ice Cube Trays, at least 2
  • Freezer
  • Sink
  • Dish Soap
  • Laundry Rack or Hanger

Instructions:

Prep Work – Make Kool Aid Ice Cubes

  1. Using hot water, mix approximately 6 ounces (3/4 cup) of water with one Kool Aid packet until the powder is completely dissolved. Use as many different colors as you like, but remember that the colors may mix, so remember your art classes from school. Purples and greens together will end up brown or other weird colors.
  2. Pour mixture into ice cube tray. If you are using multiple colors, use multiple trays. My mixtures of each color created about 6 to 8 ice cubes.
  3. Place trays in freezer and let freeze.

 Prep work – Soak Yarn

  1. Fill sink with luke warm water and add 1 cup of white vinegar.
  2. Place desired amount of yarn in water and soak it for 20 minutes.

 On to Dyeing Your Yarn

  1. Place presoaked yarn in a large pot. It does not have to be in there in any specific way, but make sure the entire bottom of the pot is covered and your yarn lays flat.
  2. Add about one cup of warm water evenly to the yarn in the pot. This is so that the yarn does not burn when heated on the stove. Make sure that there is not too much water in there. The yarn shouldn’t float and there should not be enough water for the colors to distribute through the water.
  3. Place ice cubes randomly on the surface of your yarn.
  4. Put pot on stove and heat yarn on medium heat for 20-30 minutes. Make sure that the yarn does not burn. If your water boils off, add more to the pot.
  5. Remove pot from heat. Your yarn is hot and so is your pot. Use oven mitts to carry the pot and dump yarn in the sink.
  6. Let yarn cool for 10 minutes in sink.
  7. Wash yarn with a little bit of dish soap and cold water until the water runs clear from the yarn.
  8. Hang yarn to dry.




That’s it! You have a skein of yarn dyed and ready to craft with.

3-year-old Sharky chose Grape, Pink Lemonade, and Cherry for his flavors/colors.

 

8-year-old Peanut chose Blue Raspberry, Pink Lemonade, and Cherry for his Kool-Aid flavors/colors.

 

Of course, I started knitting these hats right away.

Want to learn how to make the kids’ cute cabled hat that I made with their yarn?

Kool Aid Hat Preview

How cute are Sharky and Peanut?!

You will need the following knitting skills to complete this project:

  • Knit
  • Purl
  • Knitting in the Round
  • Purl two together
  • Knit two together

The gauge is approximately 5 stitches per inch in the cable pattern.

The pattern is written for use with OMG Liberty (my worsted weight yarn) or Lion Brand Wool Ease (worsted weight). Sizes range from baby (about 12 months) to adult.

Lion Brand’s Wool-Ease is just a little bit different than OMG Liberty, so instructions include the different needle sizes needed.

Tip: I’ve made several of these hats to test the pattern. If you find yourself playing yarn chicken with OMG Liberty in the adult size, use the smaller cast on for stitches, but follow the rest of the pattern as is, it’ll fit adult size too.

Click here to buy the pattern.




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Choosing the Right Yarn Continued: How I Picked Out Yarn for Dyeing

May 26, 2017




Just about 3 years ago now, I launched an Indiegogo campaign to grow OMG Yarn and convert my yarn shop space into a studio. At the time, I was only using one yarn base – a fingering weight, 2-ply yarn that was pretty awesome to work with – and I wanted to expand the line so that I could focus more on yarn dyeing and the aspects of being a yarnie that I loved the most.

Well, being a yarn shop owner turned yarn dyer, I was a bit of a yarn snob in the sense that I only liked working with yarns that had certain characteristics, but mainly I liked yarns that were great for both knitting and crochet AND a variety of project types.

What should you look for in a yarn to dye?

  1. Fiber content. Yes, I know the industry is saturated with 100% Superwash Merino yarns, but that was the first one I looked at. It’s easy for beginning dyers to work with and you don’t have to worry about the yarn felting while you figure out which dye techniques work best for you.If you want to focus on a specific target market (your tribe) do some research on what that group prefers. The average die hard sock knitter likes to see some nylon or other durable fiber content in their yarn, so a wool/nylon blend or a cotton blend might work best for you to start with.Want to focus on knitters and crocheters who drop big bucks on luxury fibers? Mohair, angora, cashmere, alpaca and the like may be what you want to go for. If you have no experience dyeing yarn, I’d suggest not working with these expensive fibers while you experiment.
  2. How the yarn takes up dye. Once you’ve found a good source/supplier, figured out a good dye technique, and found a type of dye you like, try a few different yarn bases of similar fiber content to see how they take up the dye.Believe it or not, the two different fingering weight yarn SW Merino bases I’ve worked with took dye differently. Sometimes it has to do with how many plies the yarn has, how tightly spun the yarn is, what dye you’re using, etc. There are so many variables that effect the dye process.




    After playing around with samples from my supplier, I actually dropped the original fingering weight yarn base I used and went all in on a more energetically spun 4-ply yarn that was SUPER soft, yet durable enough for socks. Why? The depth at which the yarn took dye compared to others was absolutely spectacular.
  3. Cost. I am a big fan of maximum quality for the lowest cost. Why spend $20 a ball for ok yarn that doesn’t do what you want it to when you can spend $10 a ball for a more luxurious feeling yarn? Why work with expensive dyes that require costly mordants or extra supplies to protect the environment you’re dyeing in, etc.Having a multi-income stream (diversified) business, I needed to get the most bang for my buck, as I essentially owned two businesses: the yarn dyeing side and the brick and mortar yarn shop side. I also paid cash for EVERYTHING, so managing cash flow was high on the priority list. Can you tell I put my MBA to good use?I was fortunate that my yarn supplier had a bajillion different yarn bases at varying costs, weights, and fiber content, so I had plenty of options to choose from. When you buy more, the bigger discount you get too! My supplier also offers free shipping on everything, and what’s not to love about that? I don’t even want to know what shipping would cost on 100 pounds of yarn (although, with my most recent collaboration for yarn dyeing, I’m about to find out…haha).
  4. The manufacturer/supplier. Yes, this is important too. Can you rely on your supplier to properly skein and protect your yarn from damage or dirt from the shipping and dye process?With over half a decade of yarn dyeing experience and yarn shop ownership at this point, I’ve definitely hit some speed bumps dealing with manufacturers. I’ve had a mill throw white yarn into a dirty box, then ship it with no bag to protect the yarn from the Wisconsin winter weather once it arrived on the shop doorstep. I was livid.And when I went to dye the yarn, I found out the hard way that the skeins were not properly tied, so I ended up with some really expensive yarn barf that I couldn’t even sell. When I called to complain, NO ONE returned my calls or addressed my concerns. I was DONE (with a capital ‘D’ DONE).No, you can’t possibly prepare for all of the what ifs, but you can significantly cut down on your disappointment or potential loss of income by choosing reputable suppliers (ask around the inter-webs…some dyers may not offer up any secrets, others, like me, are happy to offer some advice).

Check out my other post about how to choose the right yarn for a project, because that’s also a good guide for choosing yarn to dye.

In the end, it’s up to you what yarns you settle on to dye, but I wish all new yarn dyers good luck in their endeavors. It’s not easy, but it is soooooooo much fun. I mean, how else can you mix a little mad scientist work – that’s how I feel when dyeing yarn – with artistry and end up with something that will be beautiful for a lifetime (as long as you take good care of it)?




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Your Complete Guide to OMG Yarn’s Fingering Weight Yarns

April 19, 2017




Picking the right yarn to dye is difficult, just as picking the right hand dyed yarn to make your next project is. I, personally, can be a little bit of a yarn snob, because I’ve gotten spoiled from playing with so many different yarns while owning a yarn shop (and of course, I was able to sample some amazing yarns that I didn’t even carry).

I know you’ve been tempted by the gorgeous photos I share on Instagram and Facebook, but there’s no way of telling how great and soft these yarns are. This is the first in a series of posts to entice you a little bit more to try the different yarns I create. Let’s talk about OMG’s awesome fingering weight yarns, OMG Calatrava and OMG Vegas.

All About OMG Calatrava

Named after the architectural beauty known as the Milwaukee Art Museum (located in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the city in which I grew up), OMG Calatrava is an energetically spun, light fingering weight yarn.

OMG Calatrava’s details: 100% Superwash Merino Wool; gauge: 7.5 sts/in on US 2; approximately 400 yds/3.5oz.

I chose this yarn because of how it is spun and takes dye (yep, I try dyeing every yarn before I select it). It is great for shawls, scarves, and other accessories.

Because of the tight spin of the plies, you can even use it for socks. In fact, my most worn pairs of socks are made from OMG Calatrava and they hold up well, even without nylon in it!

Even though it is tough enough for socks, it is soft enough to wear next to the skin and great for baby wear, like Ola’s dress that I keep sharing pictures of (and with this little cutie wearing it, how could I not keep sharing?). I also used OMG Calatrava in the color Pisces for the latest pattern I released, the Mesa Shawl.

The Glamour of OMG Vegas

Chloe Shawlette

If you need yarn that is a bit more fancy, something with a little glitz, try OMG Vegas. A little heavier fingering weight yarn, OMG Vegas has a bit of sparkle like the lights of Las Vegas.  This would be gorgeous in any accessory imaginable or as a great gift to the yarn lover in your life.

The plies of this yarn are a bit more loosely spun, but it is not splitty, so it can be worked in knit or crochet.

OMG Vegas’ details: 63% Superwash Merino Wool, 20% Silk, 15% Nylon, 2% Polyester Glitz; gauge: 8 sts/in on US 2; approximately 420 yds/3.5oz.

My first shawl design, the Chloe Shawlette, was done in OMG Calatrava, and I still keep the sample around. It’s next to the skin soft, has a wonderful drape, and takes the dye just a little bit lighter than my other yarns, showing its unique fiber personality.




Intrigued? Well, head on over to my Etsy shop and try a skein or two of these fingering weight yarns! Use coupon code OMGYARNBALLS for a 10% discount since you’ve spent the time reading about them.

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Do It Yourself: How to Make a Modern Dream Catcher

March 29, 2017

In Native American culture, dream catchers are hung over beds to promote good dreams. In Ojibwa folklore, the net/web of the dream catcher acts as a filter, catching bad dreams, allowing the good dreams to pass through and onto sleeping child below, preventing nightmares.




Lately, I’ve been seeing a modern take on the dream catcher pop up as an alternative to macrame. They’re beautiful ways of decorating the home and a symbolic reminder of the Native American culture.

Being Native American myself (my grandfather told us stories of how his great-grandmother was assimilated into the Blackfoot tribe a loooooooong time ago), when I was given the green light to make a wall hanging for our bathroom, the first thought was to make a modern dream catcher using some of my favorite colors of my hand dyed yarn.

Here are the step-by-step instructions on how to make this fun little project to decorate the walls of your favorite space:

What you’ll need:

  • Two colors of fingering weight yarn – I used OMG Vegas (A blend of Silk, Merino, Nylon and Glitz) in two colors; Earl Grey and Surrender.
  • One 6″ steel ring – Found in the jewelry, beading aisle at Hobby Lobby.
  • One 1″ steel ring.
  • One 1/4″ wooden dowel or similar sized tree branch about 12″ in length.
  • Scissors.
  • Tape Measure.

 Preparation:

  • Choose your main color and your complimentary color.
  • You will need to cut strands prepare for construction. Each attached fringe is a bundle of 5 strands.

Main color: Cut 75 strands, each 32″ long
Complimentary color: Cut 25 strands, each 32″ long

  • Cut an additional strand of the main color approximately 24″ long and set it aside.





Instructions

Step 1: Start by attaching your main color fringes to the 6″ ring as shown below.

Fold the bundle of strands in half, place the steel hoop on top like this.

Fold the tail over the hoop and insert into the loop as shown.

Now pull the tail tight to secure the fringe to the hoop. Woohoo! You’ve attached one! Now do this 14 more times. (There will be 15 “fringes” attached to your steel hoop in the end)

Step 2: Attach your complimentary color fringes to the wooden dowel as shown below, similar to how you attached the fringes to the steel hoop.

Remember: put the dowel over your bundle, fold the tail over the dowel, and pull through the loop, securing your fringe.




Step 3: Remember your single strand? Attach it to your 1″ metal hoop in a similar fashion to how you attached your fringes.

It’ll look like this. Make sure the tails that are hanging off the ring are of equal length!

Step 4: Tie the tails from Step 3 to the wooden dowel.

It’ll look like this. You can use a small crochet hook or tapestry needle to hide the ends underneath your fringes.

Step 5: Here comes the tricky part. You’re now going to attach the two pieces – the large steel ring and the triangle created from Step 4 – together.

Lay the large steel ring on top of the triangle.

 

Similar to how you attached your fringes, fold the strands with the small steel loop attached over the large steel loop and thread it through (my middle finger is where the metal ring was passed through).

Here’s another shot of that step.




Step 6: Make adjustments as necessary and hang your dream catcher!

 

How gorgeous is that?

Now remember, if you’re having trouble figuring out Step 5, let me know!

Need more inspiration? Follow my OMG Fringes Pinterest board. I love these and have saved quite a few pins with these unique takes on the dream catcher.




References.

How Do Dream Catchers Catch Dreams? (n.d.). Retrieved March 27, 2017, from http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-do-dream-catchers-catch-dreams

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