shabby chic – OMG Yarn (balls)
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Do It Yourself: How to Make a Modern Dream Catcher

March 29, 2017

In Native American culture, dream catchers are hung over beds to promote good dreams. In Ojibwa folklore, the net/web of the dream catcher acts as a filter, catching bad dreams, allowing the good dreams to pass through and onto sleeping child below, preventing nightmares.




Lately, I’ve been seeing a modern take on the dream catcher pop up as an alternative to macrame. They’re beautiful ways of decorating the home and a symbolic reminder of the Native American culture.

Being Native American myself (my grandfather told us stories of how his great-grandmother was assimilated into the Blackfoot tribe a loooooooong time ago), when I was given the green light to make a wall hanging for our bathroom, the first thought was to make a modern dream catcher using some of my favorite colors of my hand dyed yarn.

Here are the step-by-step instructions on how to make this fun little project to decorate the walls of your favorite space:

What you’ll need:

  • Two colors of fingering weight yarn – I used OMG Vegas (A blend of Silk, Merino, Nylon and Glitz) in two colors; Earl Grey and Surrender.
  • One 6″ steel ring – Found in the jewelry, beading aisle at Hobby Lobby.
  • One 1″ steel ring.
  • One 1/4″ wooden dowel or similar sized tree branch about 12″ in length.
  • Scissors.
  • Tape Measure.

 Preparation:

  • Choose your main color and your complimentary color.
  • You will need to cut strands prepare for construction. Each attached fringe is a bundle of 5 strands.

Main color: Cut 75 strands, each 32″ long
Complimentary color: Cut 25 strands, each 32″ long

  • Cut an additional strand of the main color approximately 24″ long and set it aside.





Instructions

Step 1: Start by attaching your main color fringes to the 6″ ring as shown below.

Fold the bundle of strands in half, place the steel hoop on top like this.

Fold the tail over the hoop and insert into the loop as shown.

Now pull the tail tight to secure the fringe to the hoop. Woohoo! You’ve attached one! Now do this 14 more times. (There will be 15 “fringes” attached to your steel hoop in the end)

Step 2: Attach your complimentary color fringes to the wooden dowel as shown below, similar to how you attached the fringes to the steel hoop.

Remember: put the dowel over your bundle, fold the tail over the dowel, and pull through the loop, securing your fringe.




Step 3: Remember your single strand? Attach it to your 1″ metal hoop in a similar fashion to how you attached your fringes.

It’ll look like this. Make sure the tails that are hanging off the ring are of equal length!

Step 4: Tie the tails from Step 3 to the wooden dowel.

It’ll look like this. You can use a small crochet hook or tapestry needle to hide the ends underneath your fringes.

Step 5: Here comes the tricky part. You’re now going to attach the two pieces – the large steel ring and the triangle created from Step 4 – together.

Lay the large steel ring on top of the triangle.

 

Similar to how you attached your fringes, fold the strands with the small steel loop attached over the large steel loop and thread it through (my middle finger is where the metal ring was passed through).

Here’s another shot of that step.




Step 6: Make adjustments as necessary and hang your dream catcher!

 

How gorgeous is that?

Now remember, if you’re having trouble figuring out Step 5, let me know!

Need more inspiration? Follow my OMG Fringes Pinterest board. I love these and have saved quite a few pins with these unique takes on the dream catcher.




References.

How Do Dream Catchers Catch Dreams? (n.d.). Retrieved March 27, 2017, from http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-do-dream-catchers-catch-dreams

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This Crochet Mug Rug Will Leave You Saying “OMG”

March 21, 2017




My OMG Mug Rug has been gaining some interest for a few weeks now. As I mentioned in my post post titled “Crochet Design: Let’s Talk Filet Crochet“, I wanted to learn this new technique, so I sat down with my graph paper and plotted the OMG Mug Rug. I’ve been using the finished sample for it’s intended purpose and as a photo prop ever since.

So what is a mug rug anyway?

mug rug is like a little placemat for your favorite mug, sized to include a little place for a snack to compliment your beverage of choice. Most mug rugs tend to fit in the 4×7 to 12×8 size range, but they can be as big or as little as you want.

What you’ll need:

  • A ball of “Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Thread” in the Classic 10 size or any lace weight yarn.
  • A steel crochet hook, size 7 (1.5mm) or whatever hook matches the gauge for the yarn you’re using
  • Scissors (to cut thread when you’re finished)

Gauge is not important here, however, you will want to crochet tight enough for the finished project to be at least 4 inches by 7 inches.

See links below to order supplies.

Crochet Techniques You’ll Use:

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • sc – single crochet
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • tr – treble crochet

Skill Level: Advanced Beginner

You will need to be  able to follow a chart.

Make sure you read the instructions for each round before beginning each step. I detail how to do the corners after the main pattern of each round.




OMG Mug Rug
Instructions:

Body
Start by using filet crochet to complete the following chart:

OMG Mug Rug Chart (Opens a PDF file of chart)

NOTE: The chart is 28 squares wide and 20 squares tall. To begin, you will chain 88 stitches (85 to frame the bottom and 3 ch which counts as another dc). Since your first row on the chart is completely filled in, you will dc in the 4th ch from the hook and then dc all the way across and turn. 

Once you have completed the chart, you will have the base design!

Border
Now you will be working around the outside of the entire Body that you just completed from the chart.

Round 1: Ch 1 and sc around, working a [sc, ch 2, sc] in each corner. End with sl st to first stitch from beginning of the round.

Make sure you sc in every dc on the top and bottom and evenly spaced on the rows along the sides.  You should make sure that each side has a multiple of 7 stitches.

Round 2: Ch 3 (counts as a dc and ch 1 at beginning of round), sk st, *dc in next st, ch 1, sk st; repeat from * around, turning corners by completing a [dc, ch 2, dc] in each corner. End with sl st into 3rd ch at the beginning chains of the round.

Round 3: Ch 1 and sc around, working a [sc, ch 2, sc] in each corner. End with sl st to first stitch from beginning of the round.

Round 4: Ch 1, sk 1st sc, and sc in 2 sc, *ch 2, sk 1 sc, sc in next 6 secs; repeat from * to end, working a [sc, ch 2, sc] in the corner. End with sl st to first stitch from beginning of the round.

Round 5: Ch 2, *tr in next ch2 space, [ch 1, tr] 5 times in same ch 2 space; repeat from * in each ch 2 space to end, working a scallop in the corner space. Ch 2 at end of Round and sl st in end of the previous round.

Fasten off. Weave in ends. Lightly steam or iron to block.




How to make a Boho Chic Headband: A Crochet Tutorial

February 9, 2017

Ola’s Boho Chic Headband

Like most people these days, I spend a lot of time looking on Pinterest for projects, inspiration, and development. Usually when I’m searching for crochet projects, I come across some gorgeous lacy design that’s just a chart or a picture linking to a website in Portuguese, Spanish, or Russian. Although I’m fluent in Spanish, the other two languages are just too far off from it that I can’t decipher what anyone is trying to do.

This time, I came across a simple chart with no explanations, no project linked to it, nothing. I thought, “That would be a really cute headband for Ola!” So I sat down and muddled through the diagram and figured out how to make something similar looking and thought I’d share the project.

 

What you’ll need:

  • A ball of “Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Thread” in the Classic 10 size or any lace weight yarn
  • A steel crochet hook, size 7 (1.5mm) or whatever hook matches the gauge for the yarn you’re using
  • Scissors (to cut thread when you’re finished)
  • A poly/clear ponytail band

 

Gauge isn’t important here though, because the length of the headband will depend on the size of the head you’re making it for. Ola’s little head is about 17″ around (for now).

 

Crochet Techniques You’ll Use:

  • ch – chain
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • tr – treble crochet

 

Instructions:

1. Ch 10 sts.

 

2. Join in ring.

 

3. Ch 4 sts.

 

4. Treble crochet through center of ring.

 

5. Treble crochet 3 more times in center of ring. Total 5 tr (includes your starting ch 4).

 

6. Right from that last tr, Ch 10.

 

7. Join in ring.

 

8. Ch 4 and attach it to starting ring with a sl st.

 

9. Turn.

 

10. Make 9 tr in center of the ring you just made.

 

11. Ch 10.

 

12. Join with sl st to form a ring.

 

13. Ch 4 and attach that to previous ring with sl st. Turn.

 

14. 9 tr in ring. Keep repeating steps 11-13 until about 4″ shorter than desired length. Keep in mind, with the nature of the stitch and how it’s worked, it will have a little stretch to it too. It may take a little trial and error before you get the right length. You want the total length of the headband (including the poly band) to be about an inch or two smaller than the circumference of the head it will go on.

 

15. With last ring, 5 tr and finish off.

 

Attach both ends of your work to a poly band however you’d like and that’s it!

 

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